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Amanda Harvey
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Amanda
Harvey

What Are The Most Resistant Window Models?

Last modified: 2019/01/03 | Approximate reading time 3 mins

The windows of your home are one of the most complex and important structural elements. Not only do they allow natural light and air to enter, bringing the outdoors inside, they also keep all the unwanted outdoor elements where they belong: outside! It is important that the windows of your home are resistant to whatever comes at them.

Windows play a significant role in the thermal performance of your home, as well as keeping your loved ones safe and comfortable. Many aspects of the window are important, including framing, sealing and the glass itself. If you’re curious about the resistant window models on the market, read on to find them!

Find out which window models are the most resistant

Impact Resistant Windows

Window with shutters_RenoQuotes.com

source: Flickr, Good Millwork

For homes located in regions which are prone to hurricanes or intense winds, impact resistant windows could be a lifesaver for those inside. During high winds, branches, rocks and mailboxes can become projectiles that can shatter the glass of your windows. Shutters can work to protect against this, but they too can become objects that penetrate and break the glass of your windows.

Lucky, the technology behind high-tech laminated windows, or impact-resistant windows, makes things safer. Since this style of window is difficult to break or separate from the frame, it is not only privileged in areas with high winds, but also to prevent and reduce the possibility of break-ins, theft as well as property damage.

Although this style of window has been on the market for 20 years, models and styles have been updated to suit modern tastes. A key factor when installing this type of window is that is it sealed correctly, as the technology won’t suffice without correct sealing. The installation process will vary from manufacturer to manufacturer, so make sure to read the instructions carefully or reach out to a professional who has been trained to install windows. Also, this style of window is more expensive than your average glass, so bear this in mind if you’re considering them for your home!

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Energy-efficient windows

Installing energy-efficient windows in your home can greatly reduce energy costs. Although energy-efficient windows will initially have homeowners spending a pretty penny, they lead to lower heating and cooling expenses making them cost-effective in the long run. Depending on the style chosen, energy-efficient windows are resistant to heat or cold or both, allowing the necessary air to escape while keeping the home insulated.

First, the homeowner should determine which areas of their home or windows may be leaking air. Once that has been established, it would be recommended to install energy-efficient windows into these areas of the home.

Next, decide on the type of window your home needs. There are several types of energy-efficient windows which all operate differently and the window you choose will be based on orientation, your region's climate as well as the building design. With this in mind, make sure to do your research regarding which style of energy-efficient window is right for you!

Heat-absorbing Tinted Glass Windows

Tinted windows_RenoQuotes.com

source: Flickr, jo.schz

This style of window is resistant to incoming solar radiation, as the glass is made to absorb a large fraction of it. Heat-absorbing tinted glass windows reduce the solar heat gain coefficient and glare. Unfortunately, the tint does not lower the window’s U-factor, however, insulating glazing can be applied to prevent this.

The most common tinted glass windows are gray and bronze tinted windows, reducing the penetration of both heat and light. Green and blue tinted windows are also common and work better at penetrating visible light, slightly reducing the transfer of heat in comparison with other colours of tinted glass. Make sure to avoid black tinted windows if you live in a hot climate, as these will absorb a lot of light and create more heat than wanted.

Reflective Coatings

Reflecting coatings can be applied to already existing windows as a glaze or can be purchased as a glass type with the coating applied during manufacturing. This style window works to reduce the transmission of solar radiation, blocking more light than heat from coming into your home. This works to resist against VT (visible transmittance) and glare. Much like heat-absorbing tints, reflective coats come in assorted colours and are commonly used in hot climates to control solar heat gain.

However, this type of glass or coating is mostly used in exceptional cases, as it reduces natural light from bleeding into the home and may require homeowners to gain additional electrical lighting. 

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